Deep Learning (DL) algorithms are an extremely promising instrument in artificial intelligence. To foster their adoption in new applications and markets, a step forward is needed towards the implementation of DL inference on low-power embedded systems, enabling a shift to the edge computing paradigm. The main goal of ALOHA is to facilitate implementation of DL algorithms on heterogeneous low-energy computing platforms providing automation for optimal algorithm selection, resource allocation and deployment.

ALOHA Use cases

Speech recognition in smart industry

This scenario refers to Smart Industry, where Deep Learning is used for speech recognition. The objective of this use case is to develop an embedded speech recognition system that would activate/deactivate PLC-controlled tooling machinery or collaborative robot in an industrial environment, without relying on a cloud backend.


Read more and see the videos...

Surveillance of Critical Infrastructures

This scenario refers to Critical Infrastructures surveillance, where Deep Learning is meant to be used to define an intelligent video-based detection system for security in and around the critical infrastructure. A specific challenge is to use deep learning methods to enable technician after a short training to utilize advanced capabilities of modern surveillance techniques.

Read more...

Medical decision assistant

This use-case refers to a DL-based smart assistant, which supports emergency room situations, identifying acute intracranial bleeds in non-contrast CT images. The consortium wants to assess the benefits provided by the ALOHA tool flow within the development of an embedded medical decision assistant, considering the requirements posed by the specific application in terms of accuracy and performance.

Read more...

Architecture-awareness

The features of the architecture that will execute the inference are taken into account during the whole development process, starting from the early stages such as pre-training hyperparameter optimization and algorithm configuration.

Productivity

The tool flow implements support for agile development methodologies, to be easily adopted by SMEs and midcaps.

Adaptivity

The development process considers that the system should adapt to different operating modes at runtime.



Extensibility

The development process is conceived to support novel processing platforms to be exploitable beyond the end of the project.

Security

The development process automates the introduction of algorithm features and programming techniques improving the resilience of the system to attacks.


Parsimonious inference

In DL, good precision levels can be also obtained using algorithms with reduced complexity. All the optimization utilities in the ALOHA tool flow will consider the effects of algorithm simplification on precision, execution time, energy and power.

Latest News & Events

ALOHA mentioned in "100 Italian Robotics & Automation Stories"

 



The ALOHA project has been proudly mentioned among the "100 Italian Robotics and Automation stories" in a research report carried out by Fondazione Symbola and Enel Group.

The 100 Innovation Stories Report, promoted in cooperation with UCIMU Foundation, is now in its fourth edition, after having studied innovation in the renewable energy, circular economy and e-mobility supply chains, delves into robotics and automation, another sector of national excellence, deeply rooted in our country.

From the abstract:
Robots and automatons become part of everyday life, more and more present in housework, recreation or care. Their presence is already a consolidated reality in many contexts, as in that of surgical robots that improve the quality of procedures, helping patients to recover more quickly. In Italy, robotic surgery is already used in thousands of procedures per year. The automatic carts for the transport of goods and food, active 24 hours a day, every day, in many hospitals, logistics centres and in industry, are a further proof.
“We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that needs to be done.” A.M. TuringPREF~ACELast March, in the municipality of Peccioli in Tuscany, the first robotic shopping carts were taken into service. The carts go straight to the shops’ entrances and then reach autonomously the houses of the people who made the purchases. In May, at the Gran Caffè di Rapallo, which Hemingway was known to frequent, the first two robotic waiters in Liguria and Italy were officially put into service. While in Ravello, during the summer, a robot took turns with Maestro Massimiliano Carlini in conducting the Instrumental Ensemble of the historic Salerno State Conservatoire ‘Giuseppe Martucci’. Robots and automatons become part of everyday life, more and more present in housework, recreation or care. Their presence is already a consolidated reality in many contexts, as in that of surgical robots that improve the quality of procedures, helping patients to recover more quickly. In Italy, robotic surgery is already used in thousands of procedures per year. The automatic carts for the transport of goods and food, active 24 hours a day, every day, in many hospitals, logistics centres and in industry, are a further proof.Worldwide, the robot market has reached a value of 16.5 billion dollars; in 2018 alone, 422,000 robots were shipped worldwide, with a 6% increase compared to the previous year. The Italian industry ranks sixth in the world in terms of total stock of installed industrial robots (69,142 units in 2018)1 , with China, Japan, South Korea, United States and Germany ahead...

Preview of the content dedicated to the University of Sassari - IDEA Lab (partner in the project) and to ALOHA:

Contacts

Project Coordinator
Giuseppe Desoli - STMicroelectronics
giuseppe(dot)desoli(at)st(dot)com

Scientific Coordinator
Paolo Meloni - University of Cagliari, EOLAB
paolo(dot)meloni(at)diee(dot)unica(dot)it

Dissemination Manager
Francesca Palumbo - University of Sassari, IDEA Lab
fpalumbo(at)uniss(dot)it

Twitter

Linkedin